8 History: Japan Lesson 3 – Note Taking (Online Lesson) (ACHHS157)

notepadIn this lesson we are going to look at note taking. Yep, sounds simple enough but have you really tried to take notes effectively?

This will really help you out as we work on the rest of this topic as we will be viewing a range of Primary and Secondary sources. It is also a really quick and helpful way when it comes to the Semester Tests you are all looking forward to!

Effective Note Taking

Introduction

Notes are a brief record of facts, topics or thoughts written down as an aid to memory. Effective note taking involves more than just copying all information heard or read. Notes are a crisp but broad account of a topic or source. They aim to summarize key information and points in your own words. This enables you to gather all the important information.

Importance

As you study history, you will come across great deals of written, visual and auditory information. All this information can sometimes become overwhelming. This is what note taking attempts to solve – it breaks the information down into small pieces. They are great for revision and an excellent way to learn.

Making your notes in a few easy steps

There is no right or wrong way to effective note taking – everyone has or will develop their own methods. As long as they make sense to YOU they are okay. To get started, follow the steps below.

Step 1

Read through the text without a making any annotations or highlighting. Take note of th headings/subheadings and topic sentence – these will give you an idea of what the text is about.

Step 2

Once you have read through the text and considered what the main idea/theme behind the text is about, rea through it again. However, this time, highlight what you consider to be the key words and phrases (in yellow and any words you don’t know the meaning of in blue).

Heres an example:

Shinto

Shinto (way of the spirits) is the oldest Japanese belief system. It is a set of practices that involves respecting and celebrating the spirits that exist in the world. These spirits are called kami. A kami can take many formats, including human form, such as the Emperor, or more natural features such as mountains, rivers, lighting and trees. Tori gates were built where there are believed to be kami present and these separate the real world from the spirit world. Shinto shrines were also built for people to show their respect.

Adapted from: Greer, V et al (2012), Nelson Connect History 8, Chapter 7: Japan Under the Shoguns, p196, 1st Edition, Cengage Learning Australia.

Step 3

Now that you have highlighted the key words and phrases, you can begin your dot points. Don’t copy the person next to you! Remember, this is a personal matter and you should write your dot points in a way that suits you.

Here are my dot points:

  • Shinto is an ancient Japanese belief system
    • Involves showing respect to the spirits or gods called kami
  • Kami
    • Are spirits of the natural world
    • Examples include, the emperor, mountains and rivers
  • Ceremonies were held in shrines to show respect to the spirits
  • Tori gates separate the real world from the spirit world

Notice my dot points summarise the key points and phrases. By doing this, I have been able to halve the number of words written. This will make revising for tests a lot easier!

Your turn

Following steps 1‐3 above, summarize the extract below. Copy the text into a new Pages document on your iPad (title it History Notes). Highlight the text in Pages and ad a new text box with your dot points.

 Samurai and Bushido

Samurai were the warrior class of medieval Japan and lived by the code of Bushido “way of the warrior” (a Japanese word for the way of the samurai life, much like the code of chivalry for the Knight). It stresses loyalty, honour unto death and martial arts mastery. Born from Neo-­‐Confucianism during early Shogunate rule, Bushido was also  influenced by Shinto and Zen Buddhism, allowing  the violent existence of the samurai to be tempered by wisdom and serenity. The code emphasized complete loyalty to  ones  master.  If ones honour was tarnished, they would  commit seppuku.

Adapted from Darlington, R et al Jacaranda History Alive 8 for the Australian Curriculum.

https://itunes.apple.com/au/course/microsoft-word-effective-note/id705699885?i=167205748&mt=2

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18 thoughts on “8 History: Japan Lesson 3 – Note Taking (Online Lesson) (ACHHS157)

  1. Samurai:
    – were the warrior class of japan
    – they lived by the way of the samurai life (bushido)
    -influenced by many religions and beliefs
    -must remain faithful to their master
    -seppuku (suidide) was the punishment for betrayal

  2. The warrior class in Japan was the Samurai. They lived by the way of the warrior, or Bushido. It emphasises loyalty, honour and martial arts. Bushido changed what was always thought about the Samurai. If the loyalty lessened, the Samurai would commit suicide in a painful way.

    Bushido:
    is the was of life for a Samurai.
    They had to follow this rule.

    Neo-Confucianism
    was an early Japanese religion.
    Was a major religion.

    Seppuku
    Form of Suicide.
    Involves cutting themselves in the stomach and ripping it open.

  3. Samurai were the warrior class of medieval Japan.
    – They lived by the code of Bushido (Way of the warrior).
    Bushido stresses loyalty, honour and the mastery of the material arts.
    Neo-Confucianism is a movement in religious philosophy derived from Confucianism.
    Bushido was borne from Neo-confucianism and influenced by Shinto and Zen Buddhism.
    Bushido allowed the violent life of a samurai to be tempered by wisdom and serenity.
    Bushido emphasized loyalty to ones master.
    Seppuku is suicide that a samurai might commit if their honor was tarnished.

  4. History notes : Jordan poyser

    Samurai were the highest rank of warrior

    Bushido is the life that a warrior or samurai lives everyday

    The warrior code means that the warrior has to show complete loyalty to his master

    Samurai learn martial arts and other techniques in fighting

    Zen Buddhism is allowing samurai to fight

    If samurai show dishonesty they will commit seppuku ( commit suicide )

    Bush idol was influenced by Shinto and Zen Buddhism

  5. Neo-Confucianism: A belief that focused more on physical things as opposed to more spiritual religions.

    The Bushido was a code that trained the Samurai (warriors) to be loyal, keep their honour until death and master martial arts.

    Seppuku was the way in which a samurai would commit suicide in order to not be dishonoured by the enemy.

    Nick.

  6. Samurai were the warriors of medieval Japan and followed the code of Bushido.
    Bushido is a Japanese word for the way of samurai life
    The code emphasise loyalty to someone’s master.
    If their honour was broken they would commit seppuku.

  7. Samurai and Bushido

    Samurai were warriors of Japan.
    They lived by a code; Stressing honor, loyalty until death, and martial arts.
    It originates from Neo–Confucianism and was also influenced Japan’s national religion and Zen Buddhism.
    A samurai would have to be completely loyal to their master, and would commit seppuku if dishonored.
    Seppuku is a form of suicide. Killing yourself by cutting your stomach open.

  8. Dot points: samurai and Bushido

    Samurai- a traditional warrior of Japan.
    Bushido- a code of behavior that a Japanese warrior had to follow. It stresses loyalty and honour to the country and the emperor.
    Shinto- a belief system in Japan. Respects and celebrates the spirits (kami)
    Seppuku- to commit suicide because they have dishonored the emperor or the country.

  9. Chivalry is the medieval knightly system with its religious, moral, and social code.
    Seppuku is a ‘belly cutting’ ritual suicide.
    Bushido is the code of honour and morals developed by the Japanese samurai.

  10. Samurai warriors were Bushido the ( way of the warrior ), the code emphasized complete loyalty to ones master, and if ones honour was tarnished, they would commit seppuku.

  11. Bushido – code of behaviour for samurai
    Seppuku – suicide

    Samurai warrior class medieval Japan
    Lived by Bushido
    Bushido influenced by Shinton and Zen Buddhism
    Code bring loyalty to ones master
    If did something bad they would kill them selves

  12. Samurai, warrior class in medieval Japan
    They followed Bushido

    Bushido, a code that samurai followed
    Comes from Neo-Confucianism
    It is based on loyalty to their master
    It allows their violence to be calmed by wisdom

    Seppuku, a samurai stabbing themselves in the stomach followed by someone cutting their throat.
    If a samurai lost their honour they would commit seppuku

  13. Samurai were the warrior class of medieval japan
    Bushido a Japanese word for the way of the samurai life
    The violent existence of the samurai to be tempered by wisdom and serenity
    If ones honour was tarnished, they would commit suicide

  14. Notes:
    . Samurai lived by the code Bushido
    . Bushido- a system of loyalty and honour for the samurai
    . Chivalry- a slightly different system from the samurai, for Nights
    . Bushido was influenced by by other beliefs- Shinto, Zen, Buddhism
    . If a samurai’s honour was lost they would commit seppuku
    . Seppuku- a way of punishing themselves

  15. From this text these are the words I understood:
    •Samurai(Japanese Medieval warriors)
    •Shinto(An ancient Japanese religion)
    •Seppuku(If a samurai loses their honour they must commit it)
    •Warrior class(Samurai were the warrior class)
    •Bushido(the way the warriors lived)

  16. “Samurai and Buddhism

    Samurai were the warrior class of medieval Japan and lived by the code of Bushido “way of the warrior” (a Japanese word for the way of the samurai life, much like the code of chivalry for the Knight). It stresses loyalty, honour unto death and martial arts mastery. Born from Neo-­‐Confucianism during early Shogunate rule, Bushido was also influenced by Shinto and Zen Buddhism, allowing the violent existence of the samurai to be tempered by wisdom and serenity. The code emphasized complete loyalty to ones master. If ones honour was tarnished, they would commit seppuku.

    Yellow- Is for important phrases
    Pink- is for words I don’t know

    . martial- relating to fighting or war: martial bravery

    . Neo–Confucianism- a system of philosophic and ethical teachings found by Confucius and developed by Mencius

    . seppuku- seppuku is to commit suicide

  17. Notes:
    • Samurai are the warriors that served in medieval Japan.
    • Bushido is a code that a samurai abides in order to follow the samurai life.
    • Bushido laws include martial arts skills and honour unto death.
    • The code of Bushido was partially inspired by the practices of Shinto and Zen Buddhism.
    • Seppeku is a suicide ritual performed when a samurai dishonours his master or the code of Bushido.

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